Saturday, September 12, 2009

Cartoon Art for sale


Storyboards from "Two-Face Part II" xeroxes, 1992. No originals, I will sell the whole board (approx. 91 pages) for $75. Drawings by Jim Smith with help from Bruce Timm.

12 comments:

Weirdo said...

Wow, I always love looking at storyboards. These are fantastic. However, I always think something is lost in translation. In some cases, the energy of the original storyboard drawings is lost before it makes it to the screen. What are your feelings on that?

BTW, did you like working on B:TAS?

Jim Smith said...

Couldn't have said it better weirdo. That is the one problem that never goes away unless it's a one man job which is coming to pass after Sin City and 300.
I always loved Batman and the series was just what action cartoons needed. Bruce and them really figured it out.

Rick Roberts said...

I am with both of you about what happened in the production of this series. Take a look at Paul Dini's Batman Animated Series book sometime and you'll notice the energy of the storyboards were severely watered down in the final product.

The thing I loved about BTAS was the perfect mesh between new and old. For example, you would see cars with big fenders and black and white televisions along with high tech computers.

Weirdo said...

I loved the noirish atmosphere and how they actually dealt with more adult themes, all the while staying under the Standards and Practices. I think artists need some rules, that way they can come up with creative ways to subvert them. It challenges artists. You understand what I mean?

Rick Roberts said...

I actually have an example of what you are talking about Weirdo. In "Robin's Reckoning" Bruce Timm wanted to show the dead bodies of Dick Grayson's parents after the trapeze rope snapped. The studio said he couldn't show the bodies so all that was seen was the rope swinging. Bruceand Paul Dini thought the alternative was actually more effective then showing the bodies. It reminds me of M when Peter Lorre kills a little girl and all you see is her baloon fly away.

Jim Smith said...

Good comments. The censorship issue is curious - it does give the writers a challenge to be clever about going around the restrictions. Many classic TV shows have done well by this. Sometimes it is just a mindless power trip as in the case of the new Beany and Cecil 1988. You can read more about that in the Art of Spumco book. John K. has just finished the writing and scanning of images many of which are from my collection. (Shameless plug).

Rick Roberts said...

Oh please, be as shameless as possible. XD

Is John closing in on a release date ?

Weirdo said...

I read about that in the "Batman: Animated" book. Another example is in Batman Beyond: Return of the Joker movie. In the uncut version, Robin just shoots the Joker. In the edited version, Robin pushes the Joker into some electrical equipment and Joker is electrocuted. I thought the edited version was much scarier and a more powerful scene. That's just my opinion.

I'll be sure to buy that Art of Spumco book when it comes out. You're right Jim, there are times when censors are just on a mindless power trip.

Rick Roberts said...

I do prefer the un-edited death scene Return of The Joker. It's not really not an extreme step from the edited verison but it's alot more powerful. And that last line the Joker spoke before he died "That's not funny, That's not...". That was just terrific and poweful.

Speaking in terms of the film itself though, it was a forgetable affair. Joker comes back for a terribly generic scheme, menacing Gotham with a giant laser. I really excepted something with more of his trademark panache.

Jim Smith said...

The book should be out before Christ day I'm guessing.

Rick Roberts said...

Awesome Jim. :)

Jim Smith said...

Correction: The Spumco art book will be out in 2010.